Regexp::Common::net

Section: User Contributed Perl Documentation (3)
Updated: 2003-03-23
Index Return to Main Contents
 

NAME

Regexp::Common::net -- provide regexes for IPv4 addresses.  

SYNOPSIS

    use Regexp::Common qw /net/;

    while (<>) {
        /$RE{net}{IPv4}/       and print "Dotted decimal IP address";
        /$RE{net}{IPv4}{hex}/  and print "Dotted hexadecimal IP address";
        /$RE{net}{IPv4}{oct}{-sep => ':'}/ and
                               print "Colon separated octal IP address";
        /$RE{net}{IPv4}{bin}/  and print "Dotted binary IP address";
        /$RE{net}{MAC}/        and print "MAC address";
        /$RE{net}{MAC}{oct}{-sep => " "}/ and
                               print "Space separated octal MAC address";
    }

 

DESCRIPTION

Please consult the manual of Regexp::Common for a general description of the works of this interface.

Do not use this module directly, but load it via Regexp::Common.

This modules gives you regular expressions for various style IPv4 and MAC (or ethernet) addresses.  

$RE{net}{IPv4}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid IP address in ``dotted decimal''. Note that while 318.99.183.11 is not a valid IP address, it does match "/$RE{net}{IPv4}/", but this is because 318.99.183.11 contains a valid IP address, namely 18.99.183.11. To prevent the unwanted matching, one needs to anchor the regexp: "/^$RE{net}{IPv4}$/".

For this pattern and the next four, under "-keep" (See Regexp::Common):

$1
captures the entire match
$2
captures the first component of the address
$3
captures the second component of the address
$4
captures the third component of the address
$5
captures the final component of the address
 

$RE{net}{IPv4}{dec}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid IP address in ``dotted decimal''

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/[.]/".  

$RE{net}{IPv4}{hex}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid IP address in ``dotted hexadecimal'', with the letters "A" to "F" capitalized.

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/[.]/". "-sep=""" and "-sep=" "" are useful alternatives.  

$RE{net}{IPv4}{oct}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid IP address in ``dotted octal''

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/[.]/".  

$RE{net}{IPv4}{bin}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid IP address in ``dotted binary''

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/[.]/".  

$RE{net}{MAC}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid MAC or ethernet address as colon separated hexadecimals.

For this pattern, and the next four, under "-keep" (See Regexp::Common):

$1
captures the entire match
$2
captures the first component of the address
$3
captures the second component of the address
$4
captures the third component of the address
$5
captures the fourth component of the address
$6
captures the fifth component of the address
$7
captures the sixth and final component of the address

This pattern, and the next four, have a "subs" method as well, which will transform a matching MAC address into so called canonical format. Canonical format means that every component of the address will be exactly two hexadecimals (with a leading zero if necessary), and the components will be separated by a colon.

The "subs" method will not work for binary MAC addresses if the Perl version predates 5.6.0.  

$RE{net}{MAC}{dec}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid MAC address as colon separated decimals.

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/:/".  

$RE{net}{MAC}{hex}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid MAC address as colon separated hexadecimals, with the letters "a" to "f" in lower case.

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/:/".  

$RE{net}{MAC}{oct}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid MAC address as colon separated octals.

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/:/".  

$RE{net}{MAC}{bin}{-sep}

Returns a pattern that matches a valid MAC address as colon separated binary numbers.

If "-sep=P" is specified the pattern P is used as the separator. By default P is "qr/:/".  

$RE{net}{domain}

Returns a pattern to match domains (and hosts) as defined in RFC 1035. Under I{-keep} only the entire domain name is returned.

RFC 1035 says that a single space can be a domainname too. So, the pattern returned by $RE{net}{domain} recognizes a single space as well. This is not always what people want. If you want to recognize domainnames, but not a space, you can do one of two things, either use

    /(?! )$RE{net}{domain}/

or use the "{-nospace}" option (without an argument).  

REFERENCES

RFC 1035
Mockapetris, P.: DOMAIN NAMES - IMPLEMENTATION AND SPECIFICATION. November 1987.
 

SEE ALSO

Regexp::Common for a general description of how to use this interface.  

HISTORY

 $Log: net.pm,v $
 Revision 2.105  2004/12/28 23:31:54  abigail
 Replaced C<\d> with [0-9] (Unicode reasons)

 Revision 2.104  2004/06/30 15:11:29  abigail
 Discuss unwanted matching

 Revision 2.103  2004/06/09 21:47:01  abigail
 dec/oct greediness

 Revision 2.102  2003/03/12 22:26:35  abigail
 -nospace switch for domain names

 Revision 2.101  2003/02/01 22:55:31  abigail
 Changed Copyright years

 Revision 2.100  2003/01/21 23:19:40  abigail
 The whole world understands RCS/CVS version numbers, that 1.9 is an
 older version than 1.10. Except CPAN. Curse the idiot(s) who think
 that version numbers are floats (in which universe do floats have
 more than one decimal dot?).
 Everything is bumped to version 2.100 because CPAN couldn't deal
 with the fact one file had version 1.10.

 Revision 1.8  2003/01/10 11:03:28  abigail
 Added complete CVS history.

 Revision 1.7  2002/08/05 22:02:06  abigail
 Typo fix.

 Revision 1.6  2002/08/05 20:36:10  abigail
 Added $RE{net}{domain}

 Revision 1.5  2002/08/05 12:16:59  abigail
 Fixed 'Regex::' and 'Rexexp::' typos to 'Regexp::' (Found my Mike Castle).

 Revision 1.4  2002/08/01 10:00:01  abigail
 Got rid of the split // in the "subs" method of MAC addresses with
 configurable seperator, as this may lead to incorrect results (for
 instance, if the separator is the empty string).

 Revision 1.3  2002/07/31 23:27:57  abigail
 Added regexes for MAC addresses.

 Revision 1.2  2002/07/28 22:57:59  abigail
 Tests to pinpoint a bug in Regexp::Common's _decache.

 Revision 1.1  2002/07/25 23:53:38  abigail
 Factored out of Regexp::Common.

 

AUTHOR

Damian Conway damian@conway.org.  

MAINTAINANCE

This package is maintained by Abigail (regexp-common@abigail.nl).  

BUGS AND IRRITATIONS

Bound to be plenty.

For a start, there are many common regexes missing. Send them in to regexp-common@abigail.nl.  

COPYRIGHT

 Copyright (c) 2001 - 2004, Damian Conway and Abigail. All Rights Reserved.
       This module is free software. It may be used, redistributed
      and/or modified under the terms of the Perl Artistic License
            (see http://www.perl.com/perl/misc/Artistic.html)


 

Index

NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
$RE{net}{IPv4}
$RE{net}{IPv4}{dec}{-sep}
$RE{net}{IPv4}{hex}{-sep}
$RE{net}{IPv4}{oct}{-sep}
$RE{net}{IPv4}{bin}{-sep}
$RE{net}{MAC}
$RE{net}{MAC}{dec}{-sep}
$RE{net}{MAC}{hex}{-sep}
$RE{net}{MAC}{oct}{-sep}
$RE{net}{MAC}{bin}{-sep}
$RE{net}{domain}
REFERENCES
SEE ALSO
HISTORY
AUTHOR
MAINTAINANCE
BUGS AND IRRITATIONS
COPYRIGHT

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